Comments

Jonah December 17, 2012

I haven’t received anything like this, thank God. But I must say this is a very clever ad. I even think that given my knowledge in spam, I will be tempted to still click on the supposed link. It sounds very neat. It’s clean, it’s grammatically understandable, and it’s professional sounding. It could have been perfect, really, if the header or the From field also says FedEx. But then again, if it weren’t for this mistake, more people would have fallen into this malware and compromise data stored in their computers. So yeah thanks for the mistake.

Maria Ortiz December 18, 2012

Yep, this one looks very convincing! Since the days right before Christmas are the time to receive gifts ordered online, for example, this scam is very trustworthy. Thanks for notifying us – otherwise I see many people who will easily fall for it because it is so authentic-looking.

Beth December 21, 2012

Look out for Fed-Ex spam, too. Creepy.

Savannah December 21, 2012

Got this yesterday. Apparently the FedEx package is waiting for me at the post office? Awkward sentence structure, too. But as someone waiting for holiday orders to come in and expecting packages from relatives, I thought about it…

I’m passing on the warning to friends.

************

FedEx

Order: VGH-7840-9997774307
Order Date: Friday, 14 December 2012, 01:21 PM

Dear Customer,

Your parcel has arrived at the post office at December 20.Our courier was unable to deliver the parcel to you.

To receive a parcel, please, go to the nearest our office and show this receipt.

DOWNLOAD POSTAL RECEIPT

Best Regards, The FedEx Team.

Quinn White December 23, 2012

That’s a very interesting spam. In fact, I don’t want it to call it spam but rather a prank—well, a more serious prank. To tell you honestly, I was amused! It’s a good tease at FedEx and UPS. By the way, this reminds me of the video I saw a few days ago, about some FedEx guy leaving an iPad delivery at the door and a UPS guy eventually stealing it. Anyway, these two large couriers should pay attention to this stat since obviously the spammer is taking advantage of the holiday season. A lot of people are waiting for their packages and thus are more likely not to be mindful of the small inconsistent details of this e-mail once they received this.

Steve December 24, 2012

I actually have 3 in my inbox as I write.

Kailea December 28, 2012

Very sneaky, slimy spammers these! We’ve had four so far in the last couple days…and they look about as real as they come, in terms of capturing the FedEx logo. Scan reading, it was easy enough to seem believable. They were even clever enough to put the copyright sign with dates at the bottom!

What stopped me was remembering that FedEx, like UPS, leaves a slip to sign or take into the FedEx office, if your package is undeliverable.

But…we were waiting for packages. Had FedEx changed their protocol? Closer reading revealed terrible grammer and poor sentence structure, and even a word missing here and there. Thank God my English major came in handy.

Here’s one we got so you can see for yourselves. I’ll be spreading the word – to FedEx, friends and family, and via my social media accounts.
=============================
FedEx

Order: VGH-9106-2024138653
Order Date: Friday, 14 December 2012, 01:21 PM
Dear Customer,

Your parcel has arrived at the post office at December 20.Our courier was unable to deliver the parcel to you.

To receive a parcel, please, go to the nearest our office and show this receipt.

DOWNLOAD POSTAL RECEIPT

Best Regards, The FedEx Team.
======================
sigh

doug January 2, 2013

Anyone with a moderate grasp of English grammar would not be fooled by this silly email. Your parcel “has arrived” on a particular date? No; rather, it “arrived” on a particular date. It arrived “at” the fourth of December? No; rather, it arrived “on” the fourth of December. Go to the nearest “our post office” rather than the nearest “post office”? And why is “please” bracketed by commas when only the first comma is necessary (not to mention most conducive to meaning)?

I’m no fan of spam, but anyone fooled by this email hopefully received a remedial grammar book in his or her FedEx package….

Bernard Dy January 2, 2013

Steve, that’s REALLY scary! It’s a good thing, though, that you didn’t open any of them. Is it because you’ve already read this blog? Good for you, because I know a friend of mine almost fell into it, if not for this blog link I had sent two days before he received the fake message. But he said that it really sounded kind of authentic.

I think that’s how spam is going to sound from now on. They’re getting really smarter, and I think they’re taking the time now to really study how good e-mail messages look like.

Lilli January 26, 2013

Thanks to this blog I didn’t open these messages. I have 2 sitting in my gmail spam folder and was pretty tempted to click on the links. Who doesn’t want a parcel? Tricky tricky…

Eimear February 14, 2013

Thanks to gmail putting these messages into spam I haven’t been tempted to click on them but I have received loads, just searched today to see what it was and now thankful I haven’t clicked on where it says print receipt

Fed Ex Abuse February 15, 2013

If you have any of these emails you can send them to abuse@fedex.com

Edie February 28, 2013

Just got this today. They’ve cleaned up the language, so it now reads:

FedEx
Tracking ID: 3454-54769042
Date: Monday, 18 February 2013, 10:22 AM

Dear Client,

Your parcel has arrived at February 25.Courier was unable to deliver the parcel to you at 25 February 06:33 PM.

To receive your parcel, please, print this receipt and go to the nearest office.

Eliza March 1, 2013

Received it a few days ago, and tried opening it as I did not suspect it was a spam. The attachment did not open. Can anyone tell me this is okay if the attachment is not opened? I have virus protection software on my laptop. Will that help screen out the malware? Help!!!

Dopey Carole March 6, 2013

I’ve opened 2 of them as I’m expecting a parcel! What do I do now???

  • (required)
  • (required)