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Bill C-28, the Fighting Internet and Wireless Spam Act of 2010, has certainly caused quite a furor since it was introduced in 2009. Canada’s Anti-Spam Legislation (CASL), as it’s more commonly known, first garnered ballyhoo over its severe proposed penalties …

Not Just for Spam Any more: CASL Targets Software Installations
   

New Spam Campaign Targets Academia

A new type of spam is being targeted toward the academic world. Spam messages made to look like they are inviting the recipient to submit a paper have been detected. These messages, linked to less than reputable journals located overseas, …

New Spam Campaign Targets Academia
   

CASL vs. CAN-SPAM

Canada’s anti-spam law goes into effect June 1st, and if you are or plan to market to Canadian email addresses, you need to know being in compliance with CAN-SPAM doesn’t necessarily mean you’re automatically complying with CASL. You may need …

CASL vs. CAN-SPAM
   

Malicious Spam Campaign Hides Payload in Fake Gadget Files

A new malicious spam campaign aimed at Windows users has an interesting twist. The payload is hidden in Windows gadget files. Windows Gadgets, as you may recall, are the min apps that are displayed in the Windows sidebar in versions …

Malicious Spam Campaign Hides Payload in Fake Gadget Files
   

Walmart: Brazil’s Biggest Spammer?

Brazil has absolutely no anti-spam laws or regulations in effect and the country’s citizens are paying the price. Inboxes there are routinely flooded with spam, and it’s all perfectly legal. Don’t think the recipients are okay with that fact though. …

Walmart: Brazil’s Biggest Spammer?
   

“Com Spammers” Spam Campaign Going Strong

Security experts have detected a new spam campaign. Dubbed “Com Spammers” the campaign pumps out messages on a variety of subjects from diet pills to work at home scams and wrinkle creams. The FTC shut down part of the operation …

“Com Spammers” Spam Campaign Going Strong
   

Woman Reports Spam to Go Daddy, Gets Stalked In Return

When you report spam, you probably don’t give it much thought. You assume the ISP or email will review your report, take action, and that’s that. You certainly don’t ever wonder if they’ll tell the spammer who reported them, do …

Woman Reports Spam to Go Daddy, Gets Stalked In Return
   

What were they thinking? It’s a natural question to ask. There are scientists and then there are mad scientists, so you might be forgiven for reading this headline and assuming that we’re speaking of the latter; but things are never …

Scientists Create Guide to Better Spamming (Yes, Really)
   

Virgin Email Customers Bombarded With Spam After Blunder

A significant portion of Virgin’s email customers found themselves buried under an avalanche of spam after a classic and facepalm-worthy blunder. The company sent out a marketing email to their tens of thousands customers who get their internet service from …

Virgin Email Customers Bombarded With Spam After Blunder
   

It’s no secret that the US has been a darling for spammers. One of the world’s largest economies makes for a prime target, especially considering the connected nature of the United States. It’s a big target that just can’t be ignored, and the venerable folks at Kaspersky Lab has seen a significant change in the malicious traffic honing in on the US.

In its report, Spam in Q1 2014, Kaspersky catches us up on what’s been happening in the world of spam since their annual report issued in January. As usual, there’s plenty to talk about, so let’s take a look at some of the notables.

Report: U.S. an Oasis for Spam
   

Last Comments

  • Aussie on India Tops List of World’s Biggest Spammers August 16, 2014

    ALL my SEO spam comes from Indians. They are a big pain in the arse.

  • Andrew on Spammers Get Sleazier with Attachment within Attachment Technique August 14, 2014

    This is more relevant to the home user, who typically operates with a low level of protection against such threats. Businesses will employ sophisticated techniques at the border (eg: removal of or cloaking of ZIP files to render inert). Home users have no such luxury available to them at a reasonable cost. Until ISPs actually start offering business grade mail protection/filtering to their customers, then the consumer is on his/her own and must remain diligent. If you didn't initiate a request with the sender, then don't open the damned attachment. If you get an email claiming to be from your bank which contains an attachment, don't open it - your bank would never send you a ZIP'd archive to open anyway. Check links contained in email body before you go ahead an click on them - for instance, hovering over a link in an email will ususally display a tooltip with the actual web address encoded, rather than the false link displayed in the email content. Simple checks that anyone can perform before committing a single or double-left click on something that could cost dearly.... Diligence people! If you are, then you already made the spammers hit-rate that much lower, by simply not sleep-walking into an infection. Relying on anti-virus/malware protection apps is allowing people to abrogate themselves of a basic responsibility to know what you're doing and how it can affect your machine - adversely or otherwise. We insist that people reach a basic level of proficiency to drive a car. We need something similar for the consumer directed web....

  • Santine on Does Legitimacy Make LinkedIn and Zoosk Spam All Right? July 31, 2014

    Before we go any further--let's skip Papa John's--let's go back to the main issue: these huge companies that are allowed to spam simply because they are, well, and sending mails is just a way of marketing their products and services more. That's definitely a bull, don't you think? The title is even misleading since there's nothing legitimate with spamming.

  • Elizabeth on Do You Trust Your Bank Not to Spam You? Read This July 31, 2014

    I've come across a book about innovation, and it mentioned that banks are some of the worst in this department simply because it is very traditional. Simply put, it just continues what it has been doing for many years, even as long as hundreds of years for those very large European banks. In the process, they don't really protect themselves when they attempt to go online and make our hard-earned money and very important personal information extremely vulnerable to identity theft, among others.